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what can I do for stress incontinence?

I have stress incontinence – due to my ex and the problems he caused me, I am on tablets which do no good and have to wear pads some of the time. Any one any ideas – i am fed up with it and need to sort it all my gp does at the moment is throw tablets at me!

You should asked to be refered to a continance specialist. Have you been properly assessed? If you have stress incontinance the best way to improve it is to strenghen your pelvic floor.
The usual first treatment is to strengthen the pelvic floor muscles. About 6 in 10 cases of stress incontinence can be cured or much improved with this treatment. Medication may be advised in addition to pelvic floor exercises in some cases. Surgery may be advised if the problem persists and other treatments have not worked well.
Strengthening the pelvic floor muscles – ‘pelvic floor exercises’
It is important that you exercise the correct muscles. Your doctor may refer you to a continence advisor or physiotherapist for advice on the exercises. The sort of exercises are as follows.
Learning to exercise the right muscles:
Sit in a chair with your knees slightly apart. Imagine you are trying to stop wind escaping from your anus (back passage). You will have to squeeze the muscle just above the entrance to the anus. You should feel some movement in the muscle. Don’t move your buttocks or legs.
Now imagine you are passing urine and are trying to stop the stream. You will find yourself using slightly different parts of the pelvic floor muscles to the first exercise (ones nearer the front). These are the ones to strengthen. If you are not sure that you are exercising the right muscles, put a couple of fingers into your vagina. You should feel a gentle squeeze when doing the exercise.
Doing the exercises:
You need to do the exercises every day.
Sit, stand or lie with your knees slightly apart. Slowly tighten your pelvic floor muscles under the bladder as hard as you can. Hold to the count of five, then relax. Repeat at least five times. These are called slow pull-ups.
Then do the same exercise quickly for a second or two. Repeat at least five times. These are called fast pull-ups.
Keep repeating the five slow pull ups and the five fast pull ups for five minutes.
Aim to do the above exercises for about five minutes at least three times a day, and preferably 6-10 times a day.
Ideally, do each five minute bout of exercise in a different position each time. That is, sometimes when sitting, sometimes when standing, and sometimes when lying down.
As the muscles become stronger, increase the length of time you hold each slow pull-up. You are doing well if you can hold each slow pull-up for a count of 10 (about 10 seconds).
Do not squeeze other muscles at the same time as you squeeze your pelvic floor muscles. For example, do not use any muscles in your back, thighs, buttocks, or stomach.
In addition to the times you set aside to do the exercises, try to get into the habit of doing pelvic floor exercises whilst going about everyday life. For example, when answering the phone, when washing up, etc.
After several weeks the muscles will start to feel stronger. You may find you can squeeze the pelvic floor muscles for much longer without the muscles feeling tired.
It takes time, effort and practice to become good at these exercises. You should start to see benefits after a few weeks. However, it often takes 8-20 weeks for most improvement to occur. After this time you may be cured from stress incontinence. If you are not sure that you are doing the correct exercises, ask a doctor, physiotherapist or continence advisor for advice.
If possible, continue exercising as a part of everyday life for the rest of your life to stop the problem recurring. Once incontinence has gone, you may only need to do 1-2 five minute bouts of exercise each day to keep the pelvic floor muscles strong and toned up, and incontinence away.
Sometimes a continence advisor or physiotherapist will advise extra methods. These are in addition to the above exercises. For example:
Electrical stimulation. Sometimes a special electrical device is used to stimulate the pelvic floor muscles with the aim of making them contract and become stronger.
Biofeedback. This is a technique to help you to make sure that you are exercising the correct muscles. For this, a physiotherapist or continence advisor inserts a small device into your vagina when you are doing pelvic floor exercises. When you squeeze the right muscles, the device makes a noise (or some other signal such as a display on a computer screen) to let you know that you are squeezing the correct muscles.
Vaginal cones. These are small plastic cones that you put inside your vagina for about 15 minutes, twice a day. The cones come in a set of different weights. At first, the lightest cone is used. You need to use your pelvic floor muscles to hold the cone in place. So, it is a way to help you to exercise your pelvic floor muscles. Once you can hold onto the lightest one comfortably, you move up to the next weight, and so on.
Other devices. There are various other devices that are sold to help with pelvic floor exercises. Basically, they all rely on placing the device inside the vagina with the aim of helping the pelvic muscles to exercise and squeeze. There is little research evidence to show how well these devices work. It is best to get the advice from a continence advisor or physiotherapist before using any. One general point is that if you use one, it should be in addition to, not instead of, the standard pelvic floor exercises described above.
Medication
Duloxetine is a medicine that is usually used to treat depression. However, it was found to help with stress incontinence separate to it’s effect on depression. It is thought to work by interfering with certain chemicals that are used in transmitting nerve impulses to muscles. This helps the muscles around the urethra to contract more strongly.
One study showed that in about 6 in 10 women who took duloxetine, the number of urine ‘leakages’ were halved compared to the time before they took the medication. Therefore, on it’s own, duloxetine is not likely to cure the incontinence but may help to make it less of a problem. However, duloxetine in addition to pelvic floor exercises may give a better chance of curing the incontinence than either treatment alone.
If you are past the menopause and take hormone replacement therapy (HRT), the oestrogen in the HRT affects the tissues around the vagina and urethra. This helps to improve the symptoms of stress incontinence in some women. However, HRT is not as effective as pelvic floor exercises in curing the problem.
Surgery
Various surgical operations are used to treat stress incontinence. They tend only to be used when the above treatments have not helped. The operations aim to ‘tighten’ or support the muscles and structures below the bladder. Surgery is often successful.
Some general lifestyle measures which may help
Your GP may refer you to the local continence adviser. Continence advisors can give advice on treatments, especially pelvic floor exercises. If incontinence remains a problem, they can also give lots of advice on how to manage. For example, they may be able to supply various appliances and aids to help such as incontinence pads, etc.
Getting to the toilet. Make this as easy as possible. If you have difficulty getting about, consider special adaptations like a handrail or a raised seat in your toilet. Sometimes a commode in the bedroom makes life much easier.
Obesity. It is known that stress incontinence is more common in women who are obese. If you are obese, losing weight may help to ease the problem.
Smoking can cause cough which can aggravate symptoms. It would help not to smoke.




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4 Responses to “what can I do for stress incontinence?”

  1. shaz Says:

    You should asked to be refered to a continance specialist. Have you been properly assessed? If you have stress incontinance the best way to improve it is to strenghen your pelvic floor.
    The usual first treatment is to strengthen the pelvic floor muscles. About 6 in 10 cases of stress incontinence can be cured or much improved with this treatment. Medication may be advised in addition to pelvic floor exercises in some cases. Surgery may be advised if the problem persists and other treatments have not worked well.
    Strengthening the pelvic floor muscles – ‘pelvic floor exercises’
    It is important that you exercise the correct muscles. Your doctor may refer you to a continence advisor or physiotherapist for advice on the exercises. The sort of exercises are as follows.
    Learning to exercise the right muscles:
    Sit in a chair with your knees slightly apart. Imagine you are trying to stop wind escaping from your anus (back passage). You will have to squeeze the muscle just above the entrance to the anus. You should feel some movement in the muscle. Don’t move your buttocks or legs.
    Now imagine you are passing urine and are trying to stop the stream. You will find yourself using slightly different parts of the pelvic floor muscles to the first exercise (ones nearer the front). These are the ones to strengthen. If you are not sure that you are exercising the right muscles, put a couple of fingers into your vagina. You should feel a gentle squeeze when doing the exercise.
    Doing the exercises:
    You need to do the exercises every day.
    Sit, stand or lie with your knees slightly apart. Slowly tighten your pelvic floor muscles under the bladder as hard as you can. Hold to the count of five, then relax. Repeat at least five times. These are called slow pull-ups.
    Then do the same exercise quickly for a second or two. Repeat at least five times. These are called fast pull-ups.
    Keep repeating the five slow pull ups and the five fast pull ups for five minutes.
    Aim to do the above exercises for about five minutes at least three times a day, and preferably 6-10 times a day.
    Ideally, do each five minute bout of exercise in a different position each time. That is, sometimes when sitting, sometimes when standing, and sometimes when lying down.
    As the muscles become stronger, increase the length of time you hold each slow pull-up. You are doing well if you can hold each slow pull-up for a count of 10 (about 10 seconds).
    Do not squeeze other muscles at the same time as you squeeze your pelvic floor muscles. For example, do not use any muscles in your back, thighs, buttocks, or stomach.
    In addition to the times you set aside to do the exercises, try to get into the habit of doing pelvic floor exercises whilst going about everyday life. For example, when answering the phone, when washing up, etc.
    After several weeks the muscles will start to feel stronger. You may find you can squeeze the pelvic floor muscles for much longer without the muscles feeling tired.
    It takes time, effort and practice to become good at these exercises. You should start to see benefits after a few weeks. However, it often takes 8-20 weeks for most improvement to occur. After this time you may be cured from stress incontinence. If you are not sure that you are doing the correct exercises, ask a doctor, physiotherapist or continence advisor for advice.
    If possible, continue exercising as a part of everyday life for the rest of your life to stop the problem recurring. Once incontinence has gone, you may only need to do 1-2 five minute bouts of exercise each day to keep the pelvic floor muscles strong and toned up, and incontinence away.
    Sometimes a continence advisor or physiotherapist will advise extra methods. These are in addition to the above exercises. For example:
    Electrical stimulation. Sometimes a special electrical device is used to stimulate the pelvic floor muscles with the aim of making them contract and become stronger.
    Biofeedback. This is a technique to help you to make sure that you are exercising the correct muscles. For this, a physiotherapist or continence advisor inserts a small device into your vagina when you are doing pelvic floor exercises. When you squeeze the right muscles, the device makes a noise (or some other signal such as a display on a computer screen) to let you know that you are squeezing the correct muscles.
    Vaginal cones. These are small plastic cones that you put inside your vagina for about 15 minutes, twice a day. The cones come in a set of different weights. At first, the lightest cone is used. You need to use your pelvic floor muscles to hold the cone in place. So, it is a way to help you to exercise your pelvic floor muscles. Once you can hold onto the lightest one comfortably, you move up to the next weight, and so on.
    Other devices. There are various other devices that are sold to help with pelvic floor exercises. Basically, they all rely on placing the device inside the vagina with the aim of helping the pelvic muscles to exercise and squeeze. There is little research evidence to show how well these devices work. It is best to get the advice from a continence advisor or physiotherapist before using any. One general point is that if you use one, it should be in addition to, not instead of, the standard pelvic floor exercises described above.
    Medication
    Duloxetine is a medicine that is usually used to treat depression. However, it was found to help with stress incontinence separate to it’s effect on depression. It is thought to work by interfering with certain chemicals that are used in transmitting nerve impulses to muscles. This helps the muscles around the urethra to contract more strongly.
    One study showed that in about 6 in 10 women who took duloxetine, the number of urine ‘leakages’ were halved compared to the time before they took the medication. Therefore, on it’s own, duloxetine is not likely to cure the incontinence but may help to make it less of a problem. However, duloxetine in addition to pelvic floor exercises may give a better chance of curing the incontinence than either treatment alone.
    If you are past the menopause and take hormone replacement therapy (HRT), the oestrogen in the HRT affects the tissues around the vagina and urethra. This helps to improve the symptoms of stress incontinence in some women. However, HRT is not as effective as pelvic floor exercises in curing the problem.
    Surgery
    Various surgical operations are used to treat stress incontinence. They tend only to be used when the above treatments have not helped. The operations aim to ‘tighten’ or support the muscles and structures below the bladder. Surgery is often successful.
    Some general lifestyle measures which may help
    Your GP may refer you to the local continence adviser. Continence advisors can give advice on treatments, especially pelvic floor exercises. If incontinence remains a problem, they can also give lots of advice on how to manage. For example, they may be able to supply various appliances and aids to help such as incontinence pads, etc.
    Getting to the toilet. Make this as easy as possible. If you have difficulty getting about, consider special adaptations like a handrail or a raised seat in your toilet. Sometimes a commode in the bedroom makes life much easier.
    Obesity. It is known that stress incontinence is more common in women who are obese. If you are obese, losing weight may help to ease the problem.
    Smoking can cause cough which can aggravate symptoms. It would help not to smoke.
    References :

  2. kilmar Says:

    I wonder what people done before some layabout invented the word ‘stress’ it’s all in the mind and in this day and age most adults are on some kind of tablets or other, the human race is running on medication thanks to all these new illnesses called Debt. .
    References :

  3. japhre Says:

    take up a sport.
    takes your mind off it and you feel better afterwards.
    References :

  4. Dr Frank Says:

    I have to admit that my experience of pretty much all the drug groups used for stress incontinence has not been great. It is one of the few situations when I try all the new drugs, or in the case of this problem, often the revamped versions of old drugs, when they come out. The fact that there are so many tells me that I am right and their efficacy is poor.

    It is probably worth trying physio and pelvic floor exercises first, as at least that has no side effects.

    Anticholinergics are all, despite what the manufactures say, in my view much of a muchness.Antispasmodics often reduce symptoms a bit. SNRIs are also worth a try.

    Last resort is an attempt to do a surgical repair. These are difficult technically, and if it is contemplated, try and find out the track record of your surgeon for the procedure.
    References :
    GP for more years than I care to remember

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    Kegelmaster Instructions

    Make sure you lubricate the vaginal area with a water soluble natural lubricant and lubricate the Kegelmaster at the tip. Place the Kegelmaster between your thighs, insert the unit into your vaginal opening until it is firmly in place. You will notice this when the Kegelmaster feels much smaller and locks into place.

    Grasp your Kegelmaster firmly, you are now ready for your initial adjustment!! This is done by turning the knob at the top of the Kegelmaster counterclockwise - until the knob is no longer touching the top of the Kegelmaster and until you feel a slight pressure. This should not be uncomfortable.

    NOTE: If the knob is at the top of the Kegelmaster and you don't feel any pressure from the Kegelmaster putting resistance against the vaginal muscles, then you will have to add another spring. If you have the right tension, squeeze down against the Kegelmaster. If you are easily able to clamp down with your vaginal muscles completely for thirty reps (closings), remove the unit from your vagina and change the position of the spring, moving forward one pin (see Power Spring Combinations). If you are still able to easily close down all the way, for thirty reps - after insertion, then you must move the single spring back to the rear pin (1) and add a spring to the next forward pin (2), then repeat the process.

    Power Spring Combinations:

    1,2,3,4, 1*2, 1*3, 1*4, 2*4, 3*4, 1*2*3, 1*2*4, 1*3*4, 2*3*4, 1*2*3*4

    The ideal spring tension is determined by one's ability to close the Kegelmaster at the beginning of the exercise and become unable to close it completely at the end of 30 reps. This is not hard to do and it is a lot of fun to see how many of the springs you can squeeze for 30 reps, having difficulty with the last five. The exercise sequence starts with 3 sets of 30 reps daily. With each rep you attempt complete closure of the Kegelmaster, pausing in between each set of 30 reps for 3-5 seconds. It is recommended to work up to 6 sets of 30 reps a minimum of 3 times a week. An individual may do more sets, but it is not advisable to exceed 30 reps. A final fatigue of the muscle until the last rep is performed with very little vaginal movement is your goal. When you are finished, close the device before removing! Gently close the device, tighten the knob and slowly remove the Kegelmaster.

    Ideally, use the kegel exerciser twice a day, morning and evening. For women with prolapse, it is recommended to use the Kegelmaster in the morning to start with.

    For prolapse or any other medical condition, please consult your doctor before purchasing the Kegelmaster.

    The Kegelmaster is cleared and deemed effective by the FDA as a medical device for incontinence.

    We in no way intend to diagnose, treat or make any medical claims about the Kegelmaster.

    Cleaning the Kegelmaster is simple. Use an anti-bacterial cleaner after each use. Open device, remove springs, and use a small brush to reach all areas of the Kegelmaster. Dry and store for the next use.